Skin cancer statistics

Non melanoma skin cancer

There are around 147,000 new non-melanoma skin cancer cases in the UK every year, that's more than 400 every day (2014-2016).

In females in the UK, there were around 67,700 new cases in 2016.

In males in the UK, there were around 88,700 new cases in 2016.

Incidence rates for non-melanoma skin cancer in the UK are highest in people aged 90+ (2013-2015).

Since the early 1990s, non-melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have increased by more than two-and-a-half times (163%) in the UK. Rates in females have increased by around two-and-a-half times (157%) and rates in males have increased by around two-and-a-half times (158%).

Over the last decade, non-melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have increased by around two-thirds (65%) in the UK. Rates in females have increased by almost two-thirds (63%), and rates in males have increased by almost two-thirds (63%).

Web content: Cancer Research UK, Accessed Oct 2019.

Melanoma skin cancer

There are around 16,000 new melanoma skin cancer cases in the UK every year, that's 44 every day (2014-2016).

Melanoma skin cancer is the 5th most common cancer in the UK, accounting for 5% of all new cancer cases (2016).

In females in the UK, melanoma skin cancer is the 5th most common cancer, with around 8,300 new cases in 2016.

In males in the UK, melanoma skin cancer is the 5th most common cancer, with around 8,100 new cases in 2016.

Incidence rates for melanoma skin cancer in the UK are highest in people aged 85 to 89 (2014-2016).

Since the early 1990s, melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have more than doubled (134%) in the UK. Rates in females have increased by two times (100%) and rates in males have almost tripled (181%).

Over the last decade, melanoma skin cancer incidence rates have increased by almost half (45%) in the UK. Rates in females have increased by more than a third (35%), and rates in males have increased by almost three-fifths (55%).

Around 1 in 10 melanoma skin cancer cases are diagnosed at a late stage in England (2012-2013).

Most melanoma skin cancers occur in the trunk or legs.

Incidence rates for melanoma skin cancer are projected to rise by 7% in the UK between 2014 and 2035, to 32 cases per 100,000 people by 2035.

Melanoma skin cancer in England is less common in people living in the most deprived areas.

Melanoma skin cancer is most common in White people than Asian or Black people.

An estimated 110,300 people who had previously been diagnosed with melanoma skin cancer were alive in the UK at the end of 2010.

Web content: Cancer Research UK, Accessed Oct 2019.